Ronald Reagan's Birthday

Ronald Reagan was born on the 6th of February 1911. If ever we were in need of wisdom from the man who changed the free world, its now. Below are some of my favorite Reagan quotes, relating to some of the madness going on around us.

Soros Says Crisis Marks End of Free-Market Model That Started Under Reagan

Government’s view of the economy could be summed up in a few short phrases: If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. And if it stops moving, subsidize it.

Obama Plans to Reduce Budget Deficit to $533 Billion by End of First Term

Governments tend not to solve problems, only to rearrange them.

I am not worried about the deficit. It is big enough to take care of itself.

Madoff Left No Sign of Thousands of Reported Client Trades, Trustee Says

I know in my heart that man is good. That what is right will always eventually triumph. And there’s purpose and worth to each and every life.

Microsoft, Intel Firings Stir Resentment Over Visas for Foreign Workers

Recession is when a neighbor loses his job. Depression is when you lose yours.

My philosophy of life is that if we make up our mind what we are going to make of our lives, then work hard toward that goal, we never lose – somehow we win out.

North Pole Explorers’ Arduous Trek to Prove Arctic Melt Speed

Trust, but verify.

  • kuhnkat

    Thank you.

  • kuhnkat

    Thank you.

  • Geoff Sherrington

    Margaret Thatcher was also good, but not in Churchill’s class, or Reagan’s.

    M.T. “No one would remember the good Samaritan if he’d only had good intentions. He had money as well”.

    Re the Falklands: “It is exciting to have a real crisis on your hands, when you have spent half your political life dealing with humdrum issues like the environment”.

    With shameful immodesty, I add one of my ramblings from Andrew Bolt’s blog.

    “On ABC Lateline 20 Feb 2009, a Federal Minister stated (approximately) that countries around the world would have to make massive cash handouts into their economies. The reporter asked “Where will all this money come from?” Answer, “It will have to be borrowed”.

    “Why was the next logical question NOT asked? Like “Borrowed from whom? The people to whom the handouts are being given?”

    “What a silly charade. A cyclic parade of juggling taxes and handouts and putting labels on the parcels to give the impression of do-gooding. Net effect is predictably zero, apart from huge transaction costs. “

  • Geoff Sherrington

    Margaret Thatcher was also good, but not in Churchill’s class, or Reagan’s.

    M.T. “No one would remember the good Samaritan if he’d only had good intentions. He had money as well”.

    Re the Falklands: “It is exciting to have a real crisis on your hands, when you have spent half your political life dealing with humdrum issues like the environment”.

    With shameful immodesty, I add one of my ramblings from Andrew Bolt’s blog.

    “On ABC Lateline 20 Feb 2009, a Federal Minister stated (approximately) that countries around the world would have to make massive cash handouts into their economies. The reporter asked “Where will all this money come from?” Answer, “It will have to be borrowed”.

    “Why was the next logical question NOT asked? Like “Borrowed from whom? The people to whom the handouts are being given?”

    “What a silly charade. A cyclic parade of juggling taxes and handouts and putting labels on the parcels to give the impression of do-gooding. Net effect is predictably zero, apart from huge transaction costs. “

  • Anonymous

    Growing up in Australia, the media trained me to think Reagan and MT were the devil, bent on “tearing apart the fabric of society as we know it”, portrayed as senile maniacs bent on world annihilation. It was after reading RRs and MTs biographies I started to understand that world peace and freedom was at the top of their minds, and all the character assassination was a completely unfair characterization by snotty liberals.

  • http://landshape.org/enm davids

    Growing up in Australia, the media trained me to think Reagan and MT were the devil, bent on “tearing apart the fabric of society as we know it”, portrayed as senile maniacs bent on world annihilation. It was after reading RRs and MTs biographies I started to understand that world peace and freedom was at the top of their minds, and all the character assassination was a completely unfair characterization by snotty liberals.

  • cohenite

    An interesting essay on modern conservatism, as espoused by RR and Thatcher, and whether that conservatism has strayed from the Burkean paradigm is here;

    http://www.tnr.com/politics/story.html?id=9dfd540a-3d44-4684-a333-415ef34efa5b&p=1

  • cohenite

    An interesting essay on modern conservatism, as espoused by RR and Thatcher, and whether that conservatism has strayed from the Burkean paradigm is here;

    http://www.tnr.com/politics/story.html?id=9dfd540a-3d44-4684-a333-415ef34efa5b&p=1

  • Anonymous

    Thanks cohenite: Interesting read. I see people as conservative until they get educated into liberalism, then sometimes they get educated out again. The trouble with the Iraq war and the Bush tax cuts was that they were not necessary — in the political sense. The Reagan initiatives were necessary — threats of global war, and an economy moribund for decades. Conservatism was a cause that didn’t need to be advanced at the time. But people had to do something.

  • http://landshape.org/enm davids

    Thanks cohenite: Interesting read. I see people as conservative until they get educated into liberalism, then sometimes they get educated out again. The trouble with the Iraq war and the Bush tax cuts was that they were not necessary — in the political sense. The Reagan initiatives were necessary — threats of global war, and an economy moribund for decades. Conservatism was a cause that didn’t need to be advanced at the time. But people had to do something.

  • Anonymous

    cohenite: Here is another side to the story: http://www.americanthinker.com/2009/02/no_surrender.html

    “In addition, there’s something that was scarcely imaginable in the 30s, or even in the 60s — a thriving and intellectually diverse conservative movement. A movement that has been through the fire, that has matured in both message and execution, and that remains underestimated by both its opposition and their media enablers. The modern conservative movement is even now moving into a new phase. It’s impossible at this point to say exactly where it’s going, but anyone wishing to write it off needs a little serious study.

  • http://landshape.org/enm davids

    cohenite: Here is another side to the story: http://www.americanthinker.com/2009/02/no_surrender.html

    “In addition, there’s something that was scarcely imaginable in the 30s, or even in the 60s — a thriving and intellectually diverse conservative movement. A movement that has been through the fire, that has matured in both message and execution, and that remains underestimated by both its opposition and their media enablers. The modern conservative movement is even now moving into a new phase. It’s impossible at this point to say exactly where it’s going, but anyone wishing to write it off needs a little serious study.

  • JamesG

    I’m really struggling to see how Reagan was the man who changed the free world. Are you giving him sole credit for the collapse of communism just because it happened on his watch? So then is the current depression entirely Bush’s fault then? Hey maybe sometimes logic tells us that things are a bit more complicated than that. From my non-partisan position, Reagan deserves credit for accepting the olive branch that Gorbachev offered but little more than that. With another Russian leader Reagan’s attempted acceleration of the arms race would have had the opposite effect. We know that from history. And having known guys who were at the Wenceslas square demo (the start of it all), the general mood at the time was that they would be fired on. China’s Tianenmen square massacre absolutely proves that another leader would have done so. So give Gorbachev his due please: It was perestroika that created the conditions for the collapse of communism and it was Gorbachev’s refusal to massacre the demonstrators that kept it going. Reagan helped by saying the right things to encourage it. Ok that is important because saying the wrong thing would have been easy for a Bush Jr.

    Reagan, like Thatcher had some good ideas and some bad ones. You like to focus on the good ones. But I’d remind you of the selling of arms to the Iranian regime in order to finance anti-democracy terrorists in Nicaragua. But of course Reagan didn’t remember signing that order so we can all just ignore it can’t we? I’m also pretty certain his idea of running up a huge deficit and then saying it could take care of itself isn’t something for conservatives to crow too much at this moment in time.

  • JamesG

    I’m really struggling to see how Reagan was the man who changed the free world. Are you giving him sole credit for the collapse of communism just because it happened on his watch? So then is the current depression entirely Bush’s fault then? Hey maybe sometimes logic tells us that things are a bit more complicated than that. From my non-partisan position, Reagan deserves credit for accepting the olive branch that Gorbachev offered but little more than that. With another Russian leader Reagan’s attempted acceleration of the arms race would have had the opposite effect. We know that from history. And having known guys who were at the Wenceslas square demo (the start of it all), the general mood at the time was that they would be fired on. China’s Tianenmen square massacre absolutely proves that another leader would have done so. So give Gorbachev his due please: It was perestroika that created the conditions for the collapse of communism and it was Gorbachev’s refusal to massacre the demonstrators that kept it going. Reagan helped by saying the right things to encourage it. Ok that is important because saying the wrong thing would have been easy for a Bush Jr.

    Reagan, like Thatcher had some good ideas and some bad ones. You like to focus on the good ones. But I’d remind you of the selling of arms to the Iranian regime in order to finance anti-democracy terrorists in Nicaragua. But of course Reagan didn’t remember signing that order so we can all just ignore it can’t we? I’m also pretty certain his idea of running up a huge deficit and then saying it could take care of itself isn’t something for conservatives to crow too much at this moment in time.

  • jae

    James G, Here’s a relevant article: http://masterresource.org/?p=1106

  • jae

    James G, Here’s a relevant article: http://masterresource.org/?p=1106

  • Anonymous

    “Are you giving him sole credit for the collapse of communism just because it happened on his watch?” No, but the strategy of bankrupting the Soviet Union by bolstering defence spending was, according to biography I have read, part of a premeditated plan to accellerate its dissolution. I think he viewed that it was doomed anyway.

    As to arms deals, I think that politics can make strange bed fellows. Like some relationships, you can start off OK and end up with a psyco. Particularly if you are driven together through a common enemy. So the arms deals were a bit more complicated than is sometimes portrayed too.

  • http://landshape.org/enm David Stockwell

    “Are you giving him sole credit for the collapse of communism just because it happened on his watch?” No, but the strategy of bankrupting the Soviet Union by bolstering defence spending was, according to biography I have read, part of a premeditated plan to accellerate its dissolution. I think he viewed that it was doomed anyway.

    As to arms deals, I think that politics can make strange bed fellows. Like some relationships, you can start off OK and end up with a psyco. Particularly if you are driven together through a common enemy. So the arms deals were a bit more complicated than is sometimes portrayed too.

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